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  • 13 Jan 2014 8:36 AM | Deleted user

    In such a fast-paced and highly competitive industry, it can become difficult to stand out from the rest. Shift your career into high gear with these five tips.

    1. Network Strategically

    Networking is key to uncovering new opportunities and creating your referral network. Be strategic with the events you attend to network; attend events whose organization aligns with your career path. Establish and maintain the personal relationships you acquire from these events. You’ll be surprised who you meet and how you can mutually benefit one another. And remember, the follow-up is essential to effective networking! Click HERE to attend AWM SoCal’s upcoming networking mixer on Feb 3rd.

    2. Update Your Profiles

    Ensure that your professional profiles, such as your resume, LinkedIn, and other professional networking tools, are up-to-date with your latest accomplishments. Be as detailed as possible and show examples of your work. For resume writing tips, click here.

    3. Go on Informational Interviews

    Obtain a better understanding of a position, company, or industry that interests you by going on informational interviews. It really shows that you’re passionate and serious about your career path. Not only is this an opportunity to gain insight and practice your interview skills, but it can also lead to potential employment opportunities.

    4. Learn a New Skill

    It’s never too late to learn something new. Take a class to learn a new skill or even strengthen the ones you already have. Whether it’d be a foreign language, technical skill like Photoshop, or even an improv class to improve upon social skills, it’s important to continuously learn new skills in order to boost your career prospects.

    5. Set Goals

    It’s important to set long term and short term goals for your career. This is the first step in mapping out your plan to success. By setting goals, you clearly define where you want to go in your career, making it easy to know where to focus your efforts.

    Remember to always remain positive when pursuing your career. Now, go on and get ahead. Best of luck!  

  • 04 Jan 2014 8:24 PM | Deleted user

    By Melissa Llarena

    After entering keywords on LinkedIn, examining first and second-degree connections and browsing through countless profiles, you finally found the internal HR professional responsible for filling the job you want. Now what do you do? You don’t want your initial communication to take you out of the running, so how do you connect with the recruiter to let him or her know about your interest in the position?

    As a career coach who knows the ins and outs of how recruiters work, the first thing you should do before deciding on your plan of action is to ensure your resume is as tailored as possible to the job you want. You don’t want to reach out to the recruiter with a resume that looks unrelated to the position you’re applying for. You also want to tweak your LinkedIn profile accordingly before doing any outreach. Once you’ve tailored everything, you have a few options when it comes to contacting the recruiter:

    1. Look to see if you have any connections in common online or off.

    To make your outreach easier, it’s best to see if you have any connections in common, either online on LinkedIn or offline through someone you know who works at the company. One of the great things about connecting online via LinkedIn is that it allows you to increase and explore your network with the click of a button. Since you now have the name of the recruiter, the obvious next step is to look him or her up on the social networking site. If you see “2nd” in the top right corner of the profile, that means you have connections in common. View the names at the bottom of the profile and decide which of your shared connections, if any, you can reach out to regarding the recruiter.

    If, for some reason, the recruiter is either not on LinkedIn or is a third-degree connection who you’re unable to reach, search through your online and offline network to see who you know that either currently works or used to work at the same company as the recruiter. Similar to online, the goal is to find a connection that you can leverage to help make the introduction.

    The benefit of reaching out to one of these shared connections beforehand is that you have the opportunity to get a sense of how the recruiter operates. They may prefer an email rather than a LinkedIn request or some other form of communication. Gather as much information on the recruiter as you can so that you can approach the person strategically. Also see if you can use the connection’s name as a referral once it’s time to reach out to the recruiter, making the outreach more personalized. You have one chance to make a first impression, so determine your communication plan prior to outreach.

    2. Look to see if you have any affiliations or interests in common.

    If you lack any online or offline connections in common, do some research to see if you share any common interests or affiliations. For example, is the recruiter in the same group as you on LinkedIn or the same organization offline? The affiliation does not need to be professional; you may share an alma mater or a specific personal interest. Whatever the connection may be, bring that point of reference to the forefront in your communication to the recruiter. It may serve as an icebreaker that will help you introduce yourself in the same way a shared contact can.

    Another option is to use a shared group on LinkedIn to get the recruiter’s attention. As I mention in my blog, it’s not enough to simply join LinkedIn groups, you also need to participate. Do this by listening to the conversations taking place to see where you can strategically provide your input and possibly even reference the recruiter in the discussion. It must be something extraordinarily interesting given the recruiter’s employer and should demonstrate the thinking the solicited job requires. With this tactic, you want to be careful not to overdo it so as not to scare the recruiter off. Ideally, this will serve as another entry point in your outreach.

    3. “Cold email” the recruiter.

    When you have nothing in commonundefinedno shared contacts or affiliationsundefinedtry “cold emailing” the recruiter, also known as sending a direct email or message to a recruiter who is not expecting contact from you. This may be daunting but it’s also effective when done correctly. With a cold email or LinkedIn message, you want to be careful not to come on too strong or sound desperate. You also need to ensure your approach is highly tailored (e.g. infusing the job description keywords throughout your communications with the recruiter).

    If you decide to initially connect with the recruiter on LinkedIn, quickly move the conversation to email so that you can provide your resume and cover letter once you reach that point in the process. In your communication, briefly express your interest in the position and your desire to connect for reasons X and Y (note: your reasons should directly relate to the job you’re interested in). Engage the recruiter but remember not to go overboard.

    Conclusion

    Whether you connect through LinkedIn or email, the goal is to convey to the recruiter your interest, enthusiasm and desire to be part of the team. It requires being very resourceful and stepping out of your comfort zone to get noticed. Ultimately you want to prepare as best as you can so that you can initiate contact in the most effective way possible.

    Want more tips on communicating with recruiters? Subscribe to my blog for guidance on how to stand out from the crowd.

    About Melissa Llarena

    Melissa Llarena is a firsthand career transition expert and president of Career Outcomes Matter. She provides employers with the strategies and tools necessary to support successful employee transitions into, within, and beyond their companies. She also coaches individuals to keep her finger on the pulse of what makes for a desirable company (and boss) in an ever-changing job market. She has an MBA from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. Sign up for her blog at www.careeroutcomesmatter.com.

  • 08 Nov 2013 8:35 PM | Deleted user

    Last night, we held our Women Inspiring Women event at Loyola Marymount University. Our extraordinary panel included Gabrielle Carteris, Ronit Larone, Sandra Mitchell, and Leena Pendharkar and was moderated by Dorothy Lucey.

    There was so much positive energy in the room and great advice shared by our panelists and moderator. It was truly inspiring to learn from these amazing women, who, despite the challenges, have made extremely successful and long-lasting careers. 

    We'd like to give a special thanks to our speakers for a night of encouragement and insight and to our guests for all of the amazing energy. To see more photos from the event, please visit our Facebook.

    Share AWM SoCal with your media friends and if you're not already receiving our emails, please join our mailing list to keep in touch.

    P.S. Stay tuned for upcoming events


  • 31 Oct 2013 9:38 PM | Deleted user

    Dorothy Lucey is a (somewhat) reformed gossip reporter. She spent 18 years as co-host of Good Day L.A., the number one morning news show in L.A., reporting on entertainment, gossip and politics. Dorothy has interviewed just about every celebrity you can name -- and then some. She has hosted several national shows including Good Day LIVE and How’d They Do That, and has been a contributor on several national shows including Jane Velez Mitchell (HLN), The Young Turks, and E! She has covered murder and mayhem news on both coasts as a reporter at KCBS and WABC.

    Dorothy covered style and pop culture on a show with Regis Philbin called New York Style. For a short time she was a sports anchor and reporter on NBC. This horrified her husband because she knew very little about sports.

    Dorothy is on the board of two charities. She happens to be Secretary on both boards (which is amusing because she cannot spell). She is secretary and one of the founders of The Good News Foundation, a group of L.A. news women from competing TV stations that got together to start a charity. They have given close to $2 million to needy women and children in L.A. She has made two trips to Africa with her other charity Mending Kids International.

    Dorothy writes a BLOG called God and Gossip. Her blogs have been featured on the Huffington Post. She lives in Malibu with her husband David Goldstein, an investigative reporter for KCBS, and her son Nash.

    Dorothy is an avid paddleboarder. Her son is an avid surfer. On any given day you are bound to find one of them in the ocean.

  • 29 Oct 2013 9:39 PM | Deleted user

    Learn how some of the brightest and hardest-working female entertainment pros have made successful and long-lasting careers at the AWM Women Inspiring Women event.

    Gabrielle Carteris

    Gabrielle Carteris was elected as the executive vice president of SAG-AFTRA on Sept. 26, 2013 at the union’s inaugural national convention.

    Carteris became a household name when she landed the role of Andrea Zuckerman on the Aaron Spelling program Beverly Hills, 90210 A show with a shaky beginning, 90210 ended up being one of the longest running one-hour series in television history as well as being viewed in over 100 countries. The success of the show allowed Carteris to get involved with many great organizations, including DARE, Noxzema Extraordinary Teen program, MADD and Read to Grow.

    Carteris has also worked as a producer, creating a series of specials calledLifestories which led to her producing and hosting her own talk show for Fox, Gabrielle. Recent credits include guest starring roles on Criminal MindsMake It or Break ItThe EventLongmire, The Middle and the recent holiday television movie, 12 Christmas Wishes.

    Carteris previously served Screen Actors Guild in 2008 as 5th alternate national director, 2009 as 1st alternate national director and in 2010 she began a three year term as national board member. Her previous American Federation of Television and Radio Artists service includes two consecutive terms on the AFTRA Los Angeles Local Board and the AFTRA National Board, three terms as AFTRA convention delegate/actor category and in 2011 she was elected Los Angeles local president and national 2nd vice president.

    She also served SAG-AFTRA during the transition year as national vice president, Los Angeles.

    Ronit Larone

    Television production executive of Emmy Award winning sports and entertainment programming. 20+ years of content development and production oversight for a wide variety of genres and formats including live sports series & studio shows, concert events, comedy, reality and documentary programming. Currently serves as Sr. Coordinating Producer of Production for NFL Network's studio shows, including: NFL Total Access, GameDay First, GameDayMorning, Around the League Live & Primetime.

    Prior to the NFL Network, she was DIRECTV Entertainment Vice President and Executive Producer overseeing the on-air presentation of DIRECTV’s exclusive, 24/7 HD Channels: 'The 101 Network' and ‘n3D’. Programs include critically acclaimed dramas 'Friday Night Lights' and 'Damages'.

    Part of senior creative development and management team that launched both innovative networks for America’s #1 satellite television provider. Multi-faceted role as Network Executive in charge of overall creative look and programming flow of the two channels focused on the leadership and oversight of Original Series Productions, On-Channel Marketing & Promotions, and Program Scheduling.

    Sandra Mitchell

    An award winning journalist, Sandra has been reporting and anchoring the news in Los Angeles for nearly 15 years. She currently anchors the number 1 rated noon newscast in Los Angeles, KCAL 9 News at Noon.  Sandra also anchors the 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. newscasts on KCAL 9.  

    Known for her calm demeanor, Sandra has solo anchored during some of the biggest news stories in recent history. Sandra was live on the anchor desk to announce the death of Michael Jackson, and covered the deaths and funerals of former Presidents Ronald Reagan and Gerald Ford. More recently, she was a reassuring presence as a solo anchor during the Newtown, Connecticut school massacre, the Boston Marathon bombing, and the Santa Monica College shooting rampage. She also was the first anchor on television during the deadly shootout with former LAPD officer Christopher Dorner, live as it happened. Sandra also anchored live coverage of the election of the new Pope, and the birth and introduction of the Royal Baby Prince George.

    An engaging interviewer, Sandra has talked with Presidents and the Pope, and some of the most popular celebrities in Hollywood. A gifted storyteller, her biggest joy is telling the stories of ordinary people who make this world an extraordinary place. While in Los Angeles, Sandra has been awarded 3 Emmy Awards and 3 Golden Mike Awards.

    In 2012, Sandra was awarded the prestigious Women in Media Genii Award for Excellence in Television. (Past winners include Ellen Degeneres, Lucille Ball and Whoopi Goldberg.)

    Sandra is a Magna Cum Laude graduate of the Temple University School of Broadcast Journalism in Philadelphia. In 2012, The National Journalism Honor Society of her alma mater awarded her the Excellence in Broadcast Journalism Award.

    Before arriving in Los Angeles, Sandra reported and anchored in Huntsville, Alabama, New Orleans and St. Louis. In 1999 she made the jump to the west coast, working for the syndicated show "EXTRA," before joining KCAL 9 and CBS 2.  Sandra has traveled the world and worked all over the U.S., but now considers herself a true SoCal girl!

    As a breast cancer survivor, Sandra shared her diagnosis and treatment with Los Angeles viewers. She continues to inform and inspire others through her work with numerous charities including Susan G. Komen, Circle of Hope and Make a Difference Day.

    Follow Sandra:

    Facebook: Sandra Mitchell, news personality 

    Twitter  @newsmitchell

    Leena Pendharkar

    Leena Pendharkar is an award-winning writer/director/producer. Her most recent project is the web series Overly Attached Andy, about an earnest guy trying to navigate the muddy waters of modern dating. 

    She also directed the sketch series, So Natural, which was featured on Funny or Die. Leena also wrote and directed the feature film, Raspberry Magic, about a young who thinks she can repair her dysfunctional family by winning the science fair. It screened in over 20 film festivals, and was called “heartwarming with a strong crossover appeal” by Variety, received the Audience Award at the Philadelphia Asian American film festival, and is now playing on Starz TV, Hulu, Amazon and several other outlets.

    Leena’s feature script, A Day with Dandekar, about a retiree searching for a car a stolen car, while trying to mend his relationship with his distant wife, was selected for the Film Independent Screenwriter’s Lab, and for the prestigious Tribeca All Access program and is in active development.

    She has also made number of award-winning short films, and got her start in film in documentaries, working for PBS Frontline, A&E Biography and several other places.

    Leena holds Master's degree in Documentary Film & TV Production from the UC-Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism and is a Visiting Assistant Professor at LMU in the School of Film & TV. She teaches filmmaking courses at all levels from undergrads to grads. She is also a member of the WGA/DGA.

    Get more details and register for this special opportunity to hear from these inspiring women in the media!

    Leena Pendharkar 
  • 26 Apr 2013 8:28 PM | Deleted user

    Executive Temps is the premiere entertainment employment agency to major studios and networks and also big supporters of of AWM SoCal.

    Agency Founder, Stacy Milner is the former Executive Assistant to the chairmen of NBC and Paramount and she recently released her new book LEVERAGING UP! THE KEY TO LAUNCHING YOUR ENTERTAINMENT CAREER. Stacy’s book is the ultimate entertainment career resource guide providing future industry power players with the calculated steps necessary to achieve access, mobility and success within the field of entertainment. Tonight Show Host Jay Leno has endorsed it as, “The Best Kept Secret in the Industry” and former NBC President Warren Littlefield calls it, “A ‘must-read’ life jacket for navigating the shark infested waters of Hollywood.”

    Here is an excerpt from the book which is available at www.leveragingup.org.

    INTERVIEWING TIPS

    My husband Ted would want me to tell you that if you are fresh off the boat, plane, auto, or train just arriving in Hollywood, then you don’t know anything. Although harsh in delivery, it is the absolute truth. Your resume accomplishments are next to obsolete and nobody cares how many productions you have produced or the number of scripts you have written. Should you be given a chance to interview at a studio or network, the worst thing that you can do is talk about yourself. Boring! Nobody wants to hear about your dreams and desires until you can prove that you can support someone else’s. Then and only then will that executive invite you into their world. There may be an exception to the rule, but it is exactly that – an exception.

    If you make it to the executive’s interview seat, you are the only reason for your dismissal or hire. What you say and don’t say are key to the executive’s decision. If you are being seen for a position at a studio, this means that out of hundreds of resumes and conversations, yours has managed to surface to the top. The only person who can blow this break is you.

    So if you are not talking about yourself, who are you talking about? Everybody loves to hear well-crafted words about themselves even the most modest of all. Doing research on that exec, her daily responsibilities, and the history of the company can only show your due diligence. If given a chance to engage in the interview, only ask questions that will require the exec to talk about herself and show that you know your industry product.

    For example, “Since you became VP of Programming last December, what are some of the challenges that you experience and how might I be able to assist you in this area?” This question begs your knowledge of their advancement and simultaneously shows that you have done your homework. The exec is already familiar with your resume so there is no need to remind them of the obvious unless they ask you. Every executive is looking for someone to uniquely help them, not just use them in a ploy for future corporate mobility. If carefully crafted, the interview can be designed by you and for you to win the approval of the exec by doing the following:

    7 Steps to a Successful Interview

    1. Do your homework. Google the company and the executive.

    2. Dress for success. It’s usually business casual in most environments.

    3. Bring resume. Make sure there are no typos.

    4. Take some personality; however, listen more than you talk!

    5. Discern what the exec is saying and not saying. Read in between the lines.

    6. Demonstrate your ability to communicate effectively. For example, remove the word “like” from your vocabulary during an interview. It’s worse that filling your conversation with a string of “ums.”

    7. Most of all, relax. You don’t have the job, so there is nothing to lose!

    Your Resume

    The 3 Do’s that every resume should include are:

    1. Where did you DO it?

    2. What did you DO?

    3. How long did you DO it?


  • 25 Apr 2013 8:26 PM | Deleted user

    Jenna Goudreau, Forbes staff writer, was invited to speak at the annual Women in Leadership Conference at Yale University last weekend. She was asked to share what she has learned about being a women in media.

    Some of the questions she addressed include: What leadership challenges do women face today? How have you forged a path to success? What advice would you give younger women who hope to become leaders in their fields?

    According to the Women’s Media Center, men in media still earn 30% more than women in media. Women hold just one-third of full-time journalist positions and just a quarter of editor and top executive positions in the industry. In intellectual magazines, there are seven male bylines for every one female byline.

    Find out what are Goudreau’s top leadership lessons for women. Read the complete article at Forbes.


  • 11 Apr 2013 8:30 PM | Deleted user

    Love for Rock music is what initially drove Eileen Woodbury to work in radio. Her first job at then-KEZY/Anaheim as Promotions Director in 1988 set her up for the big leagues in Los Angeles. Her break came with the launch of Pirate Radio when she was hired as Promotions Coordinator in 1990, and was eventually promoted to Promotions Director.

    Eileen Woodbury (right) with AWM's Cyndee Maxwell

    When Pirate was sold in 1993 she went to KKBT (The Beat) as Director of Marketing, followed by a stint at Y107, then returned to The Beat until it was sold as a condition of the AMFM merge with Clear Channel Radio in 2000. She stayed on with Clear Channel and worked at CHR KIIS (Kiss) along with 92.3, which was first Jammin’ Oldies (Mega) before settling in its current Old School (Hot 92.3) format. When the company changed Modern AC Star to Alternative Rock 98-7, she and fellow Marketing Director Robert Lyles traded stations: he took on Hot 92.3 and she picked up 98-7.

    In addition to the two stations, she also handles the marketing and promotion for events involving the entire Clear Channel Radio Los Angeles cluster.

    Brand Manager

    Twenty years ago radio stations existed in one place undefined on the radio dial. But today they occupy positions in many different spaces. Eileen defines her role is as that of a brand manager, and her experience has taught her how to manage the respective KIIS and 98-7 brands across all platforms. “We still do on air and on site promotions, but now we incorporate online, Facebook, Twitter, whatever the next social media application is, and the press. It’s managing how your brand exists in all of these universes because it’s different in each one.”

    Some companies expect their marketing director and creative director to be the same person. But Eileen says creativity is a smaller part of the marketing job. “Creativity comes from a lot of different places in a radio station. Above all, a marketing director needs to be the focused, organized, strategic person that corrals all the creativity from everybody and understands what ideas are going to work in what space for your brand.”

    Making creativity work for the common goal of ratings and revenue objectives is a universal principle at Clear Channel Radio. “I’m as much responsible for helping build revenue as I am for ratings,” she says and is quick to point out that now more than ever program directors acknowledge their role in revenue development as well. “They understand how to build programming that can be packaged to sell, and they’re more receptive to it than they used to be.”

    A Deep Sense of Camaraderie

    Alluding to the days when programming and sales were frequently at odds, Eileen says that mentality no longer exists. And while she understands the different needs of both programming and sales, she doesn’t have to be a referee between the two. The long-term staff relationship at Kiss and their pride in the station is a big reason. “We’ve been doing this for such a long time; there’s not a lot of turnover here. We know what each other are thinking. We can almost complete each other’s sentences. It’s really nice.”

    The rapid fire pace of a busy radio station creates its own challenges and rewards, and Eileen says that mastering it makes her feel really good. “It’s a little schizophrenic sometimes going from one brand to another,” she explains. Her desk is covered with work for both KIIS and 98-7 undefined artwork, promotional content, etc., and it can be challenging to keep the details of dozens of different events and strategy points straight for each. “But I love it,” she says, as much as she loves working with the “kids” – college grads who join the promotion department, which she oversees. “They are like sponges, they want to learn and they are very excited to be here.”

    Role Models

    Eileen has had the benefit of mentors in her career, such as Craig Wilbraham, who was General Manager at The Beat when she worked there. He passed away in August 2010 but his legacy lives on. “At one point, all the department heads were women and we didn’t even think about it,” she recalls. “He had respect for women and he knew how to manage us in a way that made us feel comfortable with him. He thought we were smart undefined and we were all crazy in our own way with our various passions. He let us figure things out for ourselves but was always there to talk to when we needed it. He was such a motivating, hard working, smart and kind man who just touched me.”

    Sometimes the toughest bosses can also leave a positive impact, and Eileen remembers her first manager whose strict methods made her better undefined Rob Tonkin at Pirate Radio. “He was so in my grill all the time about every little thing. I credit him for making me detailed and really buttoned up. I learned a lot of skills from him. At the time it was a tad upsetting but when he left I realized how much I had learned from him.”

    Every manager offers something different, and Eileen notes the qualities she’s observed in Greg Ashlock, Regional Vice President at Clear Channel Radio Los Angeles: “He is a smart, motivating visionary. For example, when it’s time to submit our budgets, he won’t let us just submit what we did the previous year. He’ll say, ‘Tell me if what you spent last year gave you want you wanted. Do you really think you got it or was there anything you could have done a little better? Do you have any new ideas for this year?’ He always challenges us in a positive way.”

    And Eileen herself is an inspiration to the scores of young women who’ve worked with her, as evidenced by the numerous cards and letters they send her in appreciation for what she’s taught them. “I don’t think of myself as ‘a woman in media,’” she says. “I’m just a person doing a job, so when I get these letters about how it’s meant so much for them to see a woman succeed for this length of time in this position, it takes me back a little.”

    Predictors For Success

    As for the future of marketing in radio, Eileen says people who can handle multitasking and balls in air at all times are the ones who will be successful. “You have to be organized and strategic undefined but in this business things are coming at you all the time, and while you prioritize, you also have to be ok if every little thing can’t be done absolutely 100% perfectly.”

    In an industry that’s changing lightning fast, she acknowledges that not everyone can be an expert in everything, but says, “You have to surround yourself with experts and you have to understand how everything fits together.”

    Having the privilege of impacting lives in the community is a benchmark for radio, and an important function for the marketing director. “When we were looking for something for KIIS to affect and help in – we didn’t just want to raise money, we wanted to build something,” she explains. “So the station partnered with Children’s Hospital in Orange County to raise money to build a radio station in the hospital.”

    Built in the hospital lobby, the station has a real studio where the children undefined with the help of volunteers undefined can be DJs. The signal is broadcast through the TV sets in each room. Due to their illnesses there are some kids who can’t leave their room, but they can still be involved as they listen by making requests and playing contests.

    A love for Rock music that turned into a career that has benefitted charities too numerous to name, is an accomplishment that can’t be described in the title of Marketing Director – but it can be seen in lives, from college grads to sick children in Orange County and beyond.

    Love for Rock music is what initially drove Eileen Woodbury to work in radio. Her first job at then-KEZY/Anaheim as Promotions Director in 1988 set her up for the big leagues in Los Angeles. Her break came with the launch of Pirate Radio when she was hired as Promotions Coordinator in 1990, and was eventually promoted to Promotions Director.

    When Pirate was sold in 1993 she went to KKBT (The Beat) as Director of Marketing, followed by a stint at Y107, then returned to The Beat until it was sold as a condition of the AMFM merge with Clear Channel Radio in 2000. She stayed on with Clear Channel and worked at CHR KIIS (Kiss) along with 92.3, which was first Jammin’ Oldies (Mega) before settling in its current Old School (Hot 92.3) format. When the company changed Modern AC Star to Alternative Rock 98-7, she and fellow Marketing Director Robert Lyles traded stations: he took on Hot 92.3 and she picked up 98-7.

    In addition to the two stations, she also handles the marketing and promotion for events involving the entire Clear Channel Radio Los Angeles cluster.

    Brand Manager

    Twenty years ago radio stations existed in one place undefined on the radio dial. But today they occupy positions in many different spaces. Eileen defines her role is as that of a brand manager, and her experience has taught her how to manage the respective KIIS and 98-7 brands across all platforms. “We still do on air and on site promotions, but now we incorporate online, Facebook, Twitter, whatever the next social media application is, and the press. It’s managing how your brand exists in all of these universes because it’s different in each one.”

    Some companies expect their marketing director and creative director to be the same person. But Eileen says creativity is a smaller part of the marketing job. “Creativity comes from a lot of different places in a radio station. Above all, a marketing director needs to be the focused, organized, strategic person that corrals all the creativity from everybody and understands what ideas are going to work in what space for your brand.”

    Making creativity work for the common goal of ratings and revenue objectives is a universal principle at Clear Channel Radio. “I’m as much responsible for helping build revenue as I am for ratings,” she says and is quick to point out that now more than ever program directors acknowledge their role in revenue development as well. “They understand how to build programming that can be packaged to sell, and they’re more receptive to it than they used to be.”

    A Deep Sense of Camaraderie

    Alluding to the days when programming and sales were frequently at odds, Eileen says that mentality no longer exists. And while she understands the different needs of both programming and sales, she doesn’t have to be a referee between the two. The long-term staff relationship at Kiss and their pride in the station is a big reason. “We’ve been doing this for such a long time; there’s not a lot of turnover here. We know what each other are thinking. We can almost complete each other’s sentences. It’s really nice.”

    The rapid fire pace of a busy radio station creates its own challenges and rewards, and Eileen says that mastering it makes her feel really good. “It’s a little schizophrenic sometimes going from one brand to another,” she explains. Her desk is covered with work for both KIIS and 98-7 undefined artwork, promotional content, etc., and it can be challenging to keep the details of dozens of different events and strategy points straight for each. “But I love it,” she says, as much as she loves working with the “kids” – college grads who join the promotion department, which she oversees. “They are like sponges, they want to learn and they are very excited to be here.”

    Role Models

    Eileen has had the benefit of mentors in her career, such as Craig Wilbraham, who was General Manager at The Beat when she worked there. He passed away in August 2010 but his legacy lives on. “At one point, all the department heads were women and we didn’t even think about it,” she recalls. “He had respect for women and he knew how to manage us in a way that made us feel comfortable with him. He thought we were smart undefined and we were all crazy in our own way with our various passions. He let us figure things out for ourselves but was always there to talk to when we needed it. He was such a motivating, hard working, smart and kind man who just touched me.”

    Sometimes the toughest bosses can also leave a positive impact, and Eileen remembers her first manager whose strict methods made her better undefined Rob Tonkin at Pirate Radio. “He was so in my grill all the time about every little thing. I credit him for making me detailed and really buttoned up. I learned a lot of skills from him. At the time it was a tad upsetting but when he left I realized how much I had learned from him.”

    Every manager offers something different, and Eileen notes the qualities she’s observed in Greg Ashlock, Regional Vice President at Clear Channel Radio Los Angeles: “He is a smart, motivating visionary. For example, when it’s time to submit our budgets, he won’t let us just submit what we did the previous year. He’ll say, ‘Tell me if what you spent last year gave you want you wanted. Do you really think you got it or was there anything you could have done a little better? Do you have any new ideas for this year?’ He always challenges us in a positive way.”

    And Eileen herself is an inspiration to the scores of young women who’ve worked with her, as evidenced by the numerous cards and letters they send her in appreciation for what she’s taught them. “I don’t think of myself as ‘a woman in media,’” she says. “I’m just a person doing a job, so when I get these letters about how it’s meant so much for them to see a woman succeed for this length of time in this position, it takes me back a little.”

    Predictors For Success

    As for the future of marketing in radio, Eileen says people who can handle multitasking and balls in air at all times are the ones who will be successful. “You have to be organized and strategic undefined but in this business things are coming at you all the time, and while you prioritize, you also have to be ok if every little thing can’t be done absolutely 100% perfectly.”

    In an industry that’s changing lightning fast, she acknowledges that not everyone can be an expert in everything, but says, “You have to surround yourself with experts and you have to understand how everything fits together.”

    Having the privilege of impacting lives in the community is a benchmark for radio, and an important function for the marketing director. “When we were looking for something for KIIS to affect and help in – we didn’t just want to raise money, we wanted to build something,” she explains. “So the station partnered with Children’s Hospital in Orange County to raise money to build a radio station in the hospital.”

    Built in the hospital lobby, the station has a real studio where the children undefined with the help of volunteers undefined can be DJs. The signal is broadcast through the TV sets in each room. Due to their illnesses there are some kids who can’t leave their room, but they can still be involved as they listen by making requests and playing contests.

    A love for Rock music that turned into a career that has benefitted charities too numerous to name, is an accomplishment that can’t be described in the title of Marketing Director – but it can be seen in lives, from college grads to sick children in Orange County and beyond.

  • 05 Apr 2013 9:31 PM | Deleted user


    Within a week of moving to Los Angeles, Kelley Salvi learned about the Alliance for Women in Media’s Speed Mentoring event through a family member. “I thought it would be a great opportunity to see what’s out there and to meet people,” she recalls. “I met very cool people [including CBS Radio Market Controller] Valerie Blackburn. It was a great opportunity to talk to different people whether they were in journalism, TV, radio.”

    An ’08 grad, Kelley had some college radio and TV experience when she returned home to Cleveland, but still found it difficult to get work. “I thought there was more opportunity in LA so I decided to move here,” she says. Two months earlier her neighbor of 15 years had relocated to Los Angeles so the pair became roommates.

    Kelley attended the Speed Mentoring event with an open mind, not knowing what to expect. She happened to sit with Talaya Trigueros, midday air talent at CBS Radio’s Smooth AC KTWV (The Wave), and when Kelley moved to another table, she coincidentally sat with Valerie.

    ‘Found Somebody Good’

    Wave and Oldies KRTH (K-Earth) Marketing Director Mat Weig picks up the timeline of events, which occurred the Monday after Speed Mentoring. “Valerie sent out an email to a couple of the [CBS Radio] marketing directors saying she met somebody great, had a resume and asked if we needed somebody good. The words, ‘found somebody good,’ can be hard to find generally so I jumped on it.” Impressed with her passion for radio, he offered her a part time position in the promotions department for K-Earth and The Wave.

    Kelley’s college radio experience was doing on-air shows. Now in the promotions department, she’s quickly learned the importance of being organized, especially for the multifaceted aspect to the job. “I love working with the jocks at events and meeting the station fans either at events or at the station,” she adds.

    The job is a continuing education in radio, and she’s getting front line event experience. “I’ve learned what makes events successful, including signage, how to interact with people at an event and how to engage with them. And I’m trying to pick up on the lingo. Around the office I ask questions, and make sure to talk to the on air personalities and ask them how they do things and how different things work. I try to ask a lot of questions and follow Mat’s advice, which is to learn everything I can.”

    Perhaps somewhat surprising due to her age, Kelley is a big fan of Oldies music on a personal level. “I was raised with Oldies and I love working for K-Earth. It’s something I listen to even when I’m not at work. I also love music like Frank Sinatra’s, which goes back even earlier than what K-Earth plays. I have my parents to thank for that.”

    Career Path

    Part time promotions positions are fairly common in radio, Mat says. “We have a staff of about dozen part time employees and there’s always a bit of rotation. Two of our people recently got full time jobs, and that’s the nature of a part time promotion assistant. If they’re doing the job right, then they’re here to learn as much as they can, and then find opportunities to move up. Certainly it’s nice when it’s internal, and that happens on occasion. My suggestion to everyone is to learn as much as you can and use that to progress in your career.”

    When it comes to breaking into radio, Mat says that the promotions department is the top way to make it happen. For his part, Mat started at Clear Channel’s Z100 in New York as an intern for the publicity and marketing departments and rose to coordinator and then manager. He transferred to LA as the Promotion Director for KBIG and KLAC. When the company bought KOST, he swapped out KLAC for KOST, and then rose to Marketing Director for the two. He took stints at The LA Times, and then the Dodgers, before returning to his radio roots for the CBS team.

    Mat explains that a big part of the promotion job is serving as an ambassador for the station, providing customer service and helping to entertain at events. “The number one role you perform whether in the office or on the street is customer service. Usually they are our front lines of talking to our listeners. They’re the first person to receive a phone call, the first person to follow up with our winners, the first person to shake a hand with someone on the street. What they think of Kelley says a lot of what they’ll think about Talaya. They may never get a chance to see Talaya, or at least not as often, but if they meet Kelley and she’s representing really well, that reflects back on our whole station. You need to be confident and accountable and outgoing.”

    Opportunity Abounds

    A position in the radio promotions team provides ample opportunities for learning due to the heavy workload. Mat explains, “The amount of work we do in radio is extensive: contesting, event marketing, customer service, branding. We’re a lot busier in radio than many other fields. If you can get your hands in even some of what we do, it’s easy to adapt that to other fields.”

    Mat concludes with a very telling description about radio promotion and marketing jobs. “It’s a very small squad of hard-working people doing a lot of work and often for multiple radio stations.”

    As for Kelley, it didn’t take long to prove herself. She was rewarded with the Promotion Coordinator position at the stations. Says Valerie, “In a short time, Kelley proved herself to be smart, a fast learner and terribly reliable….so we moved her up to a full-time role.”

    A lot of work translates into a lot of opportunity, with learned skills that can be a tremendous asset in any career. And radio promotions jobs are an ideal place to be a mentor or a mentee.

    Sign up for our newsletters and stay on top of our Speed Mentoring and other networking events.


  • 29 Mar 2013 12:50 PM | Deleted user
    Rita Pardue is an inspiration to many in Southern California media. She is the award winning Production Manager of Southern California Public Radio’s KPCC in Pasadena – one of the few females in the country in that role. An admitted “gear geek,” her masterful production skills provide a consistently high level of audio quality that’s in tune with the station’s overall high quality programming standards.

    Her 20-plus years of experience as a performer provide a unique foundation for her current home. She’s an accomplished singer, radio host, narrator, character actor, spokesperson, teacher and volunteer. Her credits cover film, television, commercials, theater and voiceover. She is a member of AFTRA and SAG and runs her own studio, Angel Wings Productions.

    Musical Beginning Leads To Voiceover

    Rita started out as a musician, touring around the country as the vocalist in a trio. After one of those shows, someone who liked the quality of her voice when she spoke between songs approached her – and became her first agent. “She took me under her wing and taught me about the world of voiceovers,” Rita recalls, which led to her role as the voice for Rich’s Caravan of Furs.

    She soon landed in Las Vegas as a singer with the original cast of “Jubilee,” and it was there that she got serious about her radio career. “I had some goals I wanted to accomplish and I saw there was a niche market not being addressed – children’s programming on the radio.”

    Moving to Los Angeles for a job opportunity, she also continued her education, getting her Bachelor’s in Radio/TV Broadcasting, and then a fellowship at Cal State LA where she went into child development. Her colleagues questioned it but she knew she “needed to be qualified to know what was appropriate programming for kids.” At the same time, her show, “The Nothing To Do Fun Shop” was on Public Radio’s KCSN/Northridge, which she then sold to CBS affiliate KWNK/Ventura. “It became my master’s project and was the training ground for getting serious about radio and production.”

    On the side, Rita began what evolved into a 25-year relationship with the Children’s Museum of Los Angeles, teaching art and music and serving as their recording person. At the same time, Children’s Broadcasting Company arrived in LA and she was the second employee hired at KPLS’ Radio AAHS. “I was the radio mom/production person for our staff of kid DJs for five years. That was my dream job. Disney came on board and we did a weekly show, ‘Disneyland Live.’ It was so exciting to take our kid DJs there. I threw myself into that job and loved it.”

    The relationship between Children’s Broadcasting and ABC Disney fell apart when the latter decided to make a run at children’s programming on it’s own as Radio Disney. Lawsuits were filed and the legal wrangling continued for many years. Rita was one of the last people at KPLS before it was sold. “I had never been so engrossed in a format and mission and what it stood for, and it broke my heart when it ended. At the same time, after about 10 years of ‘The Nothing To Do Fun Shop,’ I decided that also needed to be put to rest, and I mourned the loss of it at the same time.”

    Arranging Passions And Priorities

    For it’s part, Radio Disney recognized Rita’s achievements and passion for children’s programming and offered her a position at the headquarters in Dallas. “I had mixed feelings about it,” she says. “But the main reason I didn’t accept was that I was a parent myself with two children [in the aftermath of a divorce and custody issues]. The sacrifice would have been to work in my passion of children’s radio and lose the opportunity of parenting my own two children. My kids were the priority so I let go of the job and stayed in LA.”

    It was the right decision and a new door opened at Salem Communications’ KKLA, a Christian teaching and talk station. Rita joined as the midday personality and of course, wore the production hat. However the gig was far more than sitting in the studio. “I did a lot of international travel and fundraising, and it was exciting to gather audio and bring it back. When I was fundraising for Food For The Poor, I contracted spinal meningitis and couldn’t walk and was hospitalized. But I recovered and went back to work and traveled to Indonesia with the Bible League and did more fundraising.”

    The events of one of those missions led to a career turning point in her life. Part of the team she was with in China went to North Korea – “one of the most oppressed countries I’ve ever been to in my life.” The tragedy of the 9/11 attacks struck and their group knew nothing about it because the government blocked the news. “When I got back to Manchuria we learned about it and were shuttled to Beijing but I couldn’t get home. I called my grade-school age sons who were staying with their father, and asked, ‘Are you ok? I don’t know when I’m getting home.’ This is where you know as a parent you have an impact. When I asked if he knew what to do, my older son said, ‘Yes, mama – pray.’”

    It took another 10 days before she could get home, giving her ample time to think about her priorities. “I loved my job at KKLA and had a great deal of satisfaction there. But my number one priority was as a parent. Number two I was passionate about radio.” She made a plan to start her business and in 2004 struck out on her own with Angel Wings Productions.

    Pay It Forward

    Like many business owners she had her share of ups and downs, and at one point realized she needed to return to full time employment. After landing her current gig with KPCC, “The very first thing I did was join the AWRT – American Women in Radio & Television as it was known then,” she recalls. “I was determined to align with other women in this industry who network and help one another. Friends had helped me in the business when I needed work, so I wanted to do the same and pay it forward. That was also my motivation to teach.”

    She teaches audio production at LA Valley Community College’s extension program, but says it’s also much more than just the technical aspects. “I thought I could impart this wonderful knowledge about digital boards and all the coolness about production. But in reality it’s teaching students how to work with each other in the group and help each other in the job search.”

    Having first-hand experience in a closed country like North Korea gave Rita a newfound appreciation for the media. “It made realize how important it is that we give accurate information. It gave me a sense of purpose and pride, and that’s an aspect that I love about working at public radio. The work ethic of my colleagues here and the painstaking effort everybody makes to ensure they present both sides of the issues is inspiring. I have such respect for my colleagues and it makes me very proud to work here and makes me bring my best.”

    Her best has brought national and local accolades. She received the Gold Award of Excellence for Audio Production in 2009 at the National Communicator Awards, and two ADDY Awards undefined a Bronze ADDY for Audio Production in 2008 and a Gold ADDY for Audio Production in 2009.

    Rita is a role model on many different levels and the excellence that she brings to the radio and performance community in Los Angeles is worth emulating.

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